Discussion:
Ragtime Encyclopedia, Discography, Sheetography, Piano Rollography
(too old to reply)
s***@sheetmusiccenter.com
2007-08-03 23:37:52 UTC
Permalink
Hello Fellow Ragtimers and Friends,

There's a new book by David A. Jasen available.

Book Description:

Ragtime: An Encyclopedia, Discography, and Sheetography is the
definitive reference work for this important popular form of music
that flourished from the 1890s through the 1920s, and was one of the
key predecessors of jazz. It collects for the first time entries on all
the important composers and performers, and descriptions of their works;
a complete listing of all known published ragtime compositions, even
those self-published and known only in single copies; and a complete
discography from the cylinder era to today. There is also a Ragtime
Piano Rollography. It also represents the culmination of a lifetime’s
research for its author, considered to be the foremost scholar of ragtime
and early 20th century popular music. Rare photographs accompany most
entries, taken from the original sheets, newspapers, and other archival
sources.

Ragtime: An Encyclopedia, Discography, and Sheetography will be a
standard reference for anyone interested in Ragtime or the history of jazz.

I'll have a more in depth review after I finish reading Ragtime.

You can actually see about 20 selected pages at amazon.com at:

http://www.amazon.com/Ragtime-Encyclopedia-Sheetography-David-Jasen/dp/0415978629/ref=sr_1_1/103-8947596-0354256?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186094280&sr=1-1

While you're reading about Ragtime, you can listen to a test
recording I made from my Piano Roll collection.

QRS 100724 - At The Cotton Pickers Ball - Played By Harry Thomas
http://www.sheetmusiccenter.com/pr/cpb.wav

Enjoy!
Joel
http://www.sheetmusiccenter.com
s***@gmail.com
2007-08-05 23:36:26 UTC
Permalink
Anyone who hasn't seen David Jasen's book first-hand can not only read
specified pages on amazon.com such as contents, a pre-selected
excerpt, and index, but can also read many more randomly-selected
pages by repeatedly clicking the "Surprise Me" option. Among the not-
so-big surprises is the book's perpetuation of the belief that Fannie
B. Woods and Ethel May Earnist were two of Charles L. Johnson's
pseudonyms. Jasen missed convincing information to the contrary from
Fanny B. Woods' son. Likewise, Jasen misses the question that ragtime
pianist and sheet music collector Terry Parrish raised about Earnist
and that Bill Edwards pursued. For those who have forgotten past
discussions about these women, information and speculation can be
found by clicking the link below:

http://www.perfessorbill.com/ragtime4a.shtml

Can anyone document the date (year, possibly month) of John Stark's
return to St. Louis from New York? Jasen's new book implies that the
move occurred in 1910 by stating that it followed Mrs. Stark's death
that year. Conflicting information in _They All Played Ragtime_
places the move in 1912, likely the second half. (Was Stark merely
slow packing?) However, it could have been 1913 . . .

Sue
Post by s***@sheetmusiccenter.com
Hello Fellow Ragtimers and Friends,
There's a new book by David A. Jasen available.
Ragtime: An Encyclopedia, Discography, and Sheetography is the
definitive reference work for this important popular form of music
that flourished from the 1890s through the 1920s, and was one of the
key predecessors of jazz. . . .<snip>
I'll have a more in depth review after I finish reading Ragtime.
Post by s***@sheetmusiccenter.com
Enjoy!
Joelhttp://www.sheetmusiccenter.com
s***@sheetmusiccenter.com
2007-08-08 16:57:27 UTC
Permalink
The information about Charles L Johnsons pseudonyms was obtained from
Charles L Johnsons publisher. For furthur clarification about this you
may contact the author. He is David A. Jasen, Professor of Media Arts
at the C.W. Post campus of Long Island University, where he has been
teaching for the past 35 years.

Joel
http://www.sheetmusiccenter.com
Post by s***@gmail.com
Anyone who hasn't seen David Jasen's book first-hand can not only read
specified pages on amazon.com such as contents, a pre-selected
excerpt, and index, but can also read many more randomly-selected
pages by repeatedly clicking the "Surprise Me" option. Among the not-
so-big surprises is the book's perpetuation of the belief that Fannie
B. Woods and Ethel May Earnist were two of Charles L. Johnson's
pseudonyms. Jasen missed convincing information to the contrary from
Fanny B. Woods' son. Likewise, Jasen misses the question that ragtime
pianist and sheet music collector Terry Parrish raised about Earnist
and that Bill Edwards pursued. For those who have forgotten past
discussions about these women, information and speculation can be
http://www.perfessorbill.com/ragtime4a.shtml
Can anyone document the date (year, possibly month) of John Stark's
return to St. Louis from New York? Jasen's new book implies that the
move occurred in 1910 by stating that it followed Mrs. Stark's death
that year. Conflicting information in _They All Played Ragtime_
places the move in 1912, likely the second half. (Was Stark merely
slow packing?) However, it could have been 1913 . . .
Sue
Post by s***@sheetmusiccenter.com
Hello Fellow Ragtimers and Friends,
There's a new book by David A. Jasen available.
Ragtime: An Encyclopedia, Discography, and Sheetography is the
definitive reference work for this important popular form of music
that flourished from the 1890s through the 1920s, and was one of the
key predecessors of jazz. . . .<snip>
I'll have a more in depth review after I finish reading Ragtime.
Post by s***@sheetmusiccenter.com
Enjoy!
Joelhttp://www.sheetmusiccenter.com
p***@gmail.com
2007-08-13 16:50:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@gmail.com
Can anyone document the date (year, possibly month) of John Stark's
return to St. Louis from New York? Jasen's new book implies that the
move occurred in 1910 by stating that it followed Mrs. Stark's death
that year. Conflicting information in _They All Played Ragtime_
places the move in 1912, likely the second half. (Was Stark merely
slow packing?) However, it could have been 1913 . . .
Sue
Hi Sue.

I am working on some publisher bios at this time, and was doing that
very bit of research this past week (thus the St. John research I was
also working on). I don't have an answer, but I have a possibility. I
have had an inordinate amount of trouble locating either John or Sarah
in the 1910 census in either NYC or St. Louis. Of note, many of the
census sheets in NYC seem to be from February through May, while the
St. Louis ones are May or later for that year. Best guess, something I
have found to be particularly true of itinerant performers, is that
Stark may have in the army at boot camp or building the Panam canal -
just kidding - likely in transit between NYC and St. Louis when the
census takers came knocking. My next step will be to find out what St.
Louis directories say in 1910 and 1911.

Two other possible traces - when was the NYC reference removed from
Stark pubs? What is the date of Sarah's death (I am having trouble
with that, but will be at the cemetery within a month to find out).

Also of note, Vicky at Scott Joplin House says her crew "discovered" a
Louis Chauvin grave in St. Louis. OK, Maybe not discovered, but re-
established. The date is March 30, 1908, which would be four days
after his Chicago death, so perhaps likely, since he still seems to
have some relatives in St. Louis (talkative as she describes them) so
assumably did then. Perhaps he was more grounded in StL. than some
reports might indicate, but chose to be an intinerant in his home town
and beyond. The grave is at Calvary Cemetery, near North Broadway and
Calvary Ave just off 70 in downtown StL. She is asking for
verification.

Bill E.
Reg Pitts
2007-08-14 21:06:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by p***@gmail.com
Post by s***@gmail.com
Can anyone document the date (year, possibly month) of John Stark's
return to St. Louis from New York? Jasen's new book implies that the
move occurred in 1910 by stating that it followed Mrs. Stark's death
that year. Conflicting information in _They All Played Ragtime_
places the move in 1912, likely the second half. (Was Stark merely
slow packing?) However, it could have been 1913 . . .
Sue
Hi Sue.
I am working on some publisher bios at this time, and was doing that
very bit of research this past week (thus the St. John research I was
also working on). I don't have an answer, but I have a possibility. I
have had an inordinate amount of trouble locating either John or Sarah
in the 1910 census in either NYC or St. Louis. Of note, many of the
census sheets in NYC seem to be from February through May, while the
St. Louis ones are May or later for that year. Best guess, something I
have found to be particularly true of itinerant performers, is that
Stark may have in the army at boot camp or building the Panam canal -
just kidding - likely in transit between NYC and St. Louis when the
census takers came knocking. My next step will be to find out what St.
Louis directories say in 1910 and 1911.
Two other possible traces - when was the NYC reference removed from
Stark pubs? What is the date of Sarah's death (I am having trouble
with that, but will be at the cemetery within a month to find out).
Also of note, Vicky at Scott Joplin House says her crew "discovered" a
Louis Chauvin grave in St. Louis. OK, Maybe not discovered, but re-
established. The date is March 30, 1908, which would be four days
after his Chicago death, so perhaps likely, since he still seems to
have some relatives in St. Louis (talkative as she describes them) so
assumably did then. Perhaps he was more grounded in StL. than some
reports might indicate, but chose to be an intinerant in his home town
and beyond. The grave is at Calvary Cemetery, near North Broadway and
Calvary Ave just off 70 in downtown StL. She is asking for
verification.
Bill E.
Hey Bill--

Sarah Ann Stark died in the city of St. Louis on November 14, 1910 of
"uraemia" with chronic nephritis as a secondary cause. Thanks to the
wonders of the Internet, you can access the database for Missouri
death certificates and view the actual certificate at
http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/deathcertificates/results.asp?
type=basic&tLName=stark&tFName=sarah&sCounty=all&tYear=#null

(this will probably wrap)

this database covers available death certs from 1910 to 1956--there is
a listing for "pre-1910" certificates, there isn't one for Louis
Chauvin--although I know he died in Chicago, it was my understanding
that one would need a death certificate in order to bury someone;
maybe the Illinois cert was sufficient to bury him in Calvary without
the cemetery folks requesting a Missouri one. Who knows?

However. two certificates for Sylvester Chauvin, a musician who died
in 1919 and his brother "Link" (Abraham Lincoln in census returns)
Chauvin, a barber who died in 1913 both show that they were buried at
Calvary Cemetery; if Louis was their brother (which would make him the
youngest son of Charles F. and Henrietta [Miles] Chauvin) or
Sylvester's son [his wife was named Mary and survived him a year], it
could appear that there was a family plot there.

You can see the Chauvin certs here:

http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/deathcertificates/results.asp?type=basic&tLName=Chauvin&tFName=&sCounty=all&tYear=#null

if the young lady at the Scott Joplin House has Louis's death
certificate, ask her if it has the parents' names listed. I would say
that it is a pretty good bet that it may be he.

Did you ever receive the copy of Harry Fischler's obit I thought I
sent you some time ago?

Continued best wishes

Reg Pitts
Ragtime Forever
s***@gmail.com
2007-08-15 00:58:53 UTC
Permalink
Thanks, Reg and Bill. The verification of Sarah's death in late 1910
raises some serious additional questions about They All Played Ragtime
if John Stark returned to Missouri soon after. In fact, it also seems
strange that they would have been living apart if she were so ill in
St. Louis.

Perhaps sheet music collectors might quickly discover clues, as Bill
suggested. Because I won't have access to St. Louis directories
before November, I'd appreciate anything you can find in directories
sooner.

Interesting Louis Chauvin news. Keep us posted about any future
confirmation.

Sue
Post by Reg Pitts
Post by p***@gmail.com
Post by s***@gmail.com
Can anyone document the date (year, possibly month) of John Stark's
return to St. Louis from New York? Jasen's new book implies that the
move occurred in 1910 by stating that it followed Mrs. Stark's death
that year. Conflicting information in _They All Played Ragtime_
places the move in 1912, likely the second half. (Was Stark merely
slow packing?) However, it could have been 1913 . . .
Sue
Hi Sue.
I am working on some publisher bios at this time, and was doing that
very bit of research this past week (thus the St. John research I was
also working on). I don't have an answer, but I have a possibility. I
have had an inordinate amount of trouble locating either John or Sarah
in the 1910 census in either NYC or St. Louis. Of note, many of the
census sheets in NYC seem to be from February through May, while the
St. Louis ones are May or later for that year. Best guess, something I
have found to be particularly true of itinerant performers, is that
Stark may have in the army at boot camp or building the Panam canal -
just kidding - likely in transit between NYC and St. Louis when the
census takers came knocking. My next step will be to find out what St.
Louis directories say in 1910 and 1911.
Two other possible traces - when was the NYC reference removed from
Stark pubs? What is the date of Sarah's death (I am having trouble
with that, but will be at the cemetery within a month to find out).
Also of note, Vicky at Scott Joplin House says her crew "discovered" a
Louis Chauvin grave in St. Louis. OK, Maybe not discovered, but re-
established. The date is March 30, 1908, which would be four days
after his Chicago death, so perhaps likely, since he still seems to
have some relatives in St. Louis (talkative as she describes them) so
assumably did then. Perhaps he was more grounded in StL. than some
reports might indicate, but chose to be an intinerant in his home town
and beyond. The grave is at Calvary Cemetery, near North Broadway and
Calvary Ave just off 70 in downtown StL. She is asking for
verification.
Bill E.
Hey Bill--
Sarah Ann Stark died in the city of St. Louis on November 14, 1910 of
"uraemia" with chronic nephritis as a secondary cause. Thanks to the
wonders of the Internet, you can access the database for Missouri
death certificates and view the actual certificate athttp://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/deathcertificates/results.asp?
type=basic&tLName=stark&tFName=sarah&sCounty=all&tYear=#null
(this will probably wrap)
this database covers available death certs from 1910 to 1956--there is
a listing for "pre-1910" certificates, there isn't one for Louis
Chauvin--although I know he died in Chicago, it was my understanding
that one would need a death certificate in order to bury someone;
maybe the Illinois cert was sufficient to bury him in Calvary without
the cemetery folks requesting a Missouri one. Who knows?
However. two certificates for Sylvester Chauvin, a musician who died
in 1919 and his brother "Link" (Abraham Lincoln in census returns)
Chauvin, a barber who died in 1913 both show that they were buried at
Calvary Cemetery; if Louis was their brother (which would make him the
youngest son of Charles F. and Henrietta [Miles] Chauvin) or
Sylvester's son [his wife was named Mary and survived him a year], it
could appear that there was a family plot there.
http://www.sos.mo.gov/archives/resources/deathcertificates/results.as...
if the young lady at the Scott Joplin House has Louis's death
certificate, ask her if it has the parents' names listed. I would say
that it is a pretty good bet that it may be he.
Did you ever receive the copy of Harry Fischler's obit I thought I
sent you some time ago?
Continued best wishes
Reg Pitts
Ragtime Forever- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Loading...