Discussion:
LA HABANERA y el TANGO CONGO
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tango congo
2012-10-14 02:45:05 UTC
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The habanera is a sung variant of the Cuban quadrille , which in turn comes from the Spanish quadrille reaching Havana in the second half of the eighteenth century. The first habanera (anonymous) appears in a newspaper of Havana in 1842. Sebastian Iradier, a Basque who visited Cuba in the mid-nineteenth century, wrote La Paloma, the most famous habanera, and The Arreglito, the piece that George Bizet incorporated to the Opera Carmen. In 1854 the New Orleans musician, Louis Moreau Gottschalk, came to Cuba and lived for several years in his three trips to the island. There he met Nicolas Ruiz Espadero and Manuel Saumells, Cuban musicians who composed contradanzas. Gottschalk composed several of his works in Cuba and the influence of Cuban music is very clear in his work. Jelly Roll Morton and Scott Joplin had influences from Gottschalk and Cuban music. Morton called it: "The Spanish Tinge". And that is the TANGO CONGO. A rhythmic cell based in West Africa and developed and incorporated in Cuba, both as to the Cuban quadrille and the habanera then dispersed through the world. It is present in the rhythmic base of Argentinean tango, Brazilian maxixe, the Peruvian waltz, the footwork Veracruz, danzon, bolero, Delta blues, ragtime, rockabilly, Afro-Cuban jazz and rock and roll.

TANGO-CONGO: Binary time. United dotted eighth to a sixteenth (downbeat) and sixteenth in the first half of the second half).
v***@gmail.com
2013-03-08 05:30:29 UTC
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Post by tango congo
The habanera is a sung variant of the Cuban quadrille , which in turn comes from the Spanish quadrille reaching Havana in the second half of the eighteenth century. The first habanera (anonymous) appears in a newspaper of Havana in 1842. Sebastian Iradier, a Basque who visited Cuba in the mid-nineteenth century, wrote La Paloma, the most famous habanera, and The Arreglito, the piece that George Bizet incorporated to the Opera Carmen. In 1854 the New Orleans musician, Louis Moreau Gottschalk, came to Cuba and lived for several years in his three trips to the island. There he met Nicolas Ruiz Espadero and Manuel Saumells, Cuban musicians who composed contradanzas. Gottschalk composed several of his works in Cuba and the influence of Cuban music is very clear in his work. Jelly Roll Morton and Scott Joplin had influences from Gottschalk and Cuban music. Morton called it: "The Spanish Tinge". And that is the TANGO CONGO. A rhythmic cell based in West Africa and developed and incorporated in Cuba, both as to the Cuban quadrille and the habanera then dispersed through the world. It is present in the rhythmic base of Argentinean tango, Brazilian maxixe, the Peruvian waltz, the footwork Veracruz, danzon, bolero, Delta blues, ragtime, rockabilly, Afro-Cuban jazz and rock and roll.
TANGO-CONGO: Binary time. United dotted eighth to a sixteenth (downbeat) and sixteenth in the first half of the second half).
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